The education secretary, Gillian Keegan, has insisted that schools will not have to pay to fix crumbling concrete, following concerns that cash-strapped schools would have to foot some of the bill.

Ms Keegan said that the government will cover the costs of fixing unsafe concrete, which is thought to affect around 100 schools in England. The concrete, known as reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete (RAAC), can deteriorate over time and become a safety hazard.

In some cases, schools have had to close or partially close due to the risk of collapse. In others, schools have had to install scaffolding or propping to support the concrete.

Ms Keegan said that the government is “committed to making sure that all schools are safe” and that the costs of fixing the concrete will be “ringfenced” from other education spending.

She said: “We will not be asking schools to find the money to fix this issue. The Department for Education will pay for it.”

The government has not yet said how much it will cost to fix the concrete, but it is likely to be “many, many millions of pounds”.

The issue of crumbling concrete in schools has been a growing concern in recent years. In 2021, the government announced that it would be reviewing the use of RAAC in schools. The review is due to report back later this year.

In the meantime, the government has said that it will be working with schools to identify and fix any unsafe concrete.

The news that schools will not have to pay to fix the concrete has been welcomed by school leaders and teachers. Geoff Barton, the general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: “This is a welcome announcement that will provide much-needed certainty for schools affected by this issue.”

He added: “It is essential that the government now works with schools to ensure that the repairs are carried out as quickly and efficiently as possible.”

The government’s commitment to fixing the crumbling concrete is a positive step, but it is important to remember that this is a complex issue that will take time to resolve. It is also important to ensure that the repairs are carried out to a high standard so that schools can be safe for pupils and staff.

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Previous post Baldur’s Gate 3: The Newest Battleground in the War between Wizards and Sorcerers
Next post UK weather: Heatwave could bring highest temperature of the year this week

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

MOST EXPENSIVE CAR 2023 Golden Knights raise Stanley Cup banner for first time Skittles banned in California from 2027: Why? Olympic gold Medalist Mary Lou Retton fighting for life Burton Albion vs Cambridge: Team News and Preview